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2 edition of Hepatitis C virus genome variation in the NS5 region and the E2/NS1 hypervariable region found in the catalog.

Hepatitis C virus genome variation in the NS5 region and the E2/NS1 hypervariable region

Sarah Barber

Hepatitis C virus genome variation in the NS5 region and the E2/NS1 hypervariable region

a study of genotypes and genome variability in response to alpha-interferon therapy

by Sarah Barber

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.Sc.) - University of Surrey, 1996.

StatementSarah Barber.
ContributionsUniversity of Surrey. School of Biological Sciences.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19356226M

In an agammaglobulinemic patient with chronic hepatitis C, a previously identified hypervariable region of the major envelope glycoprotein remained unchanged for years. Serum-derived RNA amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was cloned in a bacterial vector, and a minimum of three independent clones were sequenced by dideoxy chain termination by: The non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been the subject of intensive research over the last decade. It is generally accepted that NS5A is a pleiotropic protein with key roles in both viral RNA replication and modulation of the physiology of the host cell. Our understanding of the role of NS5A in the virus life cycle has been hampered by the lack of a robust in Cited by:

  The association between the severity of chronic hepatitis C and the variability of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome remains controversial, but to our knowledge few data are available to date regarding T‐cell epitope coding regions in transplant by: Hepatitis C is an infectious disease caused by a virus. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) attacks the liver, leading to inflammation. Most infections become chronic, as the body is unable to get rid of the virus. In the United States, more than 3 million people have chronic HCV infection.

  Abstract. Recombination is an important driver of genetic diversity, though it is relatively uncommon in hepatitis C virus (HCV). Recent investigation of sequence data acquired from HCV clinical trials produced twenty-one full-genome recombinant viruses belonging to three putative inter-subtype forms 2b/1a, 2b/1b, and 2k/: Reilly Hostager, Manon Ragonnet-Cronin, Ben Murrell, Charlotte Hedskog, Anu Osinusi, Simone Susser. Hypogammaglobulinemia is a problem with the immune system in which not enough gamma globulins are produced in the blood (thus hypo-+ gamma + globulin + -emia).This results in a lower antibody count, which impairs the immune system, increasing risk of mmaglobulinemia may result from a variety of primary genetic immune system defects, such as common variable immunodeficiency, or Specialty: Hematology.


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Hepatitis C virus genome variation in the NS5 region and the E2/NS1 hypervariable region by Sarah Barber Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows a high degree of variability resulting in many different variants. In this work we described the variability of several subgenomic fragments from the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) and E1, E2/NS1 and NS5 regions comparing, for every position, all the sequences published in GenBank v.

88 (July ) as well as new Cited by: INTRODUCTION. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancy worldwide 1) and associated cirrhosis is a major risk factor for this tumor 2).Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major pathogenic agent of chronic hepatitis which often leads to cirrhosis and HCC 3).It is unclear whether the viral infection increases the risk of HCC only through the associated cirrhosis or whether Cited by: 2.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection afflicts more than million people worldwide, with the great majority of patients with acute hepatitis C developing chronic HCV infection. It can ultimately result in liver cirrhosis, hepatic failure or hepatocellular carcinoma, which are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year.

Despite the discovery of HCV over 15 years ago, our knowledge Cited by: GASTROENTEROLOGY ; Hypervariable Region of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein (E2/NS1) in an Agammaglobulinemic Patient UMESH KUMAR, JOHN MONJARDINO, and HOWARD C.

THOMAS Academic Department of Medicine, St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine, London, England In an agammaglobulinemic patient with chronic hepatitis C Cited by:   Comparison of the rate of sequence variation in the hypervariable region of E2/NS1 region of hepatitis C virus in normal and hypogammaglobulinemic patients.

Hepatology Cited by:   Follow‐Up Study of Hypervariable Region Sequences of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Genome in an Infant with Delayed Anti‐HCV Antibody Responses.

Yuko Katayama. Department of Microbiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan a single clone of HCV, as determined by quasispecies of the hypervariable region (HVR) of the Cited by: 6. Sequence evolution of the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) in the N terminus of E2/NS1 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was studied retrospectively in six chimpanzees inoculated with the same genotype 1b.

Nucleotide sequences of the hepatitis C virus genome spanning the region from the core to envelope were used to calculate the nucleotide diversity: % ± % in 5 patients with acute.

The 5'-terminal sequence of the hepatitis C virus genome. Jpn J. Exp. Med. ; 9 Tanaka T, Kato N, Nakagawa M, et al. Molecular cloning of hepatitis C virus genome from a single Japanese carrier: sequence variation within the same individual and among infected individ- by: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes persistent infection in most patients.

To clarify the mechanisms underlying establishment of this persistent infection, nucleotide sequences of the E1/E2 region were. More than 80% of individuals infected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) become chronically infected (), with outcomes varying from persistent asymptomatic infection to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, or hepatocellular phenomenon distinguishes HCV from other members of the Flaviviridae such as yellow fever virus, dengue virus, or pestiviruses, which do not normally establish persistent Cited by: The hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) of the putative envelope encoding E2 region of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was analyzed in sequential samples from three patients with acute type C hepatitis.

The genetic evolution of the NS3 and NS5B regions of the Hepatitis C virus is diverse after liver transplantation suggesting a complex interplay between viral evolution and clinical by: 9.

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a small (55–65 nm in size), enveloped, positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus of the family hepatitis C virus is the cause of hepatitis C and some cancers such as liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, abbreviated HCC) and lymphomas in : Flaviviridae.

Nucleotide diversity of hypervariable region 1 of hepatitis C virus in Japanese hemophiliacs with chronic hepatitis C and patients with chronic posttransfusion. In the remaining six patients, hepatitis C virus-RNA was not eradicated. The predominant hepatitis C virus which survived interferon treatment was the mutant hepatitis C virus with 3–19 out of 81 nucleotide substitutions in the hypervariable region, resulting in 2–14 out of 27 amino acid by:   Spontaneous mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation and have a prominent role in evolution.

RNA viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) have Cited by: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major etiologic agent of non-A, non-B hepatitis. HCV infection frequently causes chronic hepatitis, which progresses to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the discovery of HCV ina large number of genetic analyses of HCV have been reported, and the viral genome structure has been by: Proc Nat Acad Sci USA ; 9: 53 Enomoto N, Sato C, Kurosald M and Marumo F.

Hepatitis C virus after infection treatment has the variation in the hypervariable region of envelope 2 gene. J Hepatologu ; 54 Kumar U, Brown J, Monjardino J and Thomas H. Sequence variation J. Brown in the large envelope Cited by: 6. Mutations in NS5A region of hepatitis C virus genome correlate with presence of NS5A antibodies and response to interferon therapy for most common european hepatitis C virus genotypes.

Lionel Frangeul M.D. Corresponding Author. E-mail address: [email protected]‐hop‐ by:. Rapid Sequence Variation of the Hypervariable Region of Hepatitis C Virus During the Course of Chronic Infection chronic hepatitis C virus infection. These sequence variations seem to occur as an adaptive response of in the N-terminus of the E2/NS1 of the HCV genome in cross-sectional comparative studies ().Cited by: van Doorn L J, Capriles I, Maertens G, Deleys R, Murray K, Kos T, Schellekens H, Quint W.

Sequence evolution of the hypervariable region in the putative envelope region e2/NS1 of hepatitis C virus is correlated with specific humoral immune responses.

J Virol. ; – [PMC free article].R amplified a 7-kb product that coded nonstructural proteins (NS2 to NS5). The RT-PCR cycling conditions were as follows: 55°C for 30 min and 94°C for 2 min, followed by 39 cycles of 94°C for 15 s, 60°C and 58°C for 30 s (7- and 4-kb reactions, respectively), 68°C for 1 min/kb, and a final extension of 68°C .